Home Ice bergs 1,000-foot-high icebergs sank 3,000 miles from Canada to the Florida Keys almost 30,000 years ago

1,000-foot-high icebergs sank 3,000 miles from Canada to the Florida Keys almost 30,000 years ago

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Giant icebergs could be seen floating off the coast of Florida just over 30,000 years ago, according to a new study.

The 1,000-foot icebergs – approaching the size of the Eiffel Tower – sank more than 3,000 miles from Canada and reached south to the Florida Keys, according to research published in Nature Communications.

Experts from the US Geological Survey have found nearly 700 “tracks” – or plow marks – on the seabed near the Outer Banks of North Carolina, at depths between 557 and 1,246 feet.

It is likely that the scour was caused by huge icebergs, the USGS wrote in a Facebook post.

“The idea that icebergs can reach Florida is incredible,” said lead author of the study, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution climate modeler Dr. Alan Condron, in a statement. declaration.

“The occurrence of scours at such low latitudes is very unexpected, not only because of the unusually high melt rates in this region, but also because the scours are found under the northward flowing Gulf Stream.”

Experts used radiocarbon dating on shells known as foraminifera in the sediments to determine when the icebergs headed south.

This period corresponds to a “massive discharge of icebergs known as the Heinrich 3 event,” according to USGS geologist Dr. Jenna Hill.

“We also expect that there will be younger and older scour characteristics that stem from other discharge events, given that there are still hundreds of scours to be sampled,” added Hill.

To find the nearly 700 scourings, they used high-resolution seabed mapping and a new iceberg model.

US Geological Survey experts have found nearly 700 ‘trace’ icebergs – or plow marks – on the seabed near the Outer Banks of North Carolina from icebergs native to Canada

The scourings were found at depths between 557 and 1,246 feet.  It is likely that the washouts were caused by massive icebergs, approaching the same size as the Eiffel Tower, which measures 1,066 feet at its end.

The scourings were found at depths between 557 and 1,246 feet. It is likely that the washouts were caused by massive icebergs, approaching the same size as the Eiffel Tower, which measures 1,066 feet at its end.

Experts used radiocarbon dating on shells known as foraminifera in the sediments to determine when the icebergs flowed south

Experts used radiocarbon dating on shells known as foraminifera in the sediments to determine when the icebergs flowed south

The huge chunks of ice traveled at least 3,000 miles from Canada and ended up as far south as the Florida Keys

The huge chunks of ice traveled at least 3,000 miles from Canada and ended up as far south as the Florida Keys

To find the nearly 700 scourings, they used high-resolution seabed mapping and a new iceberg model.

To find the nearly 700 scourings, they used high-resolution seabed mapping and a new iceberg model.

To find the nearly 700 scourings, they used high-resolution seabed mapping and a new iceberg model.

To find the nearly 700 scourings, they used high-resolution seabed mapping and a new iceberg model.

The temperature of the ocean water south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina is between 68 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit

The temperature of the ocean water south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina is between 68 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit

As such, icebergs likely drifted against the normal northward flow, toward the Gulf Stream, due to glacial flooding from Hudson Bay, Canada.

As such, icebergs likely drifted against the normal northward flow, toward the Gulf Stream, due to glacial flooding from Hudson Bay, Canada.

Ocean water temperatures south of Cape Hatteras, North Carolina are between 68 and 77 degrees Fahrenheit, so the icebergs have likely drifted against the normal northward flow towards the Gulf Stream , due to glacial flooding from Hudson Bay, Canada.

“These floods create a cold and rapid southerly coastal current that carries icebergs to Florida,” Condron added. “The model also produces a ‘scour’ on the seabed in the same places as the actual scour. “

Condon continued, “What our model suggests is that these icebergs are caught in currents created by glacial meltwater and are making their way along the coast. When a large glacial lake dam breaks and releases huge amounts of fresh water into the ocean, there is enough water to create these strong coastal currents that essentially move icebergs in the opposite direction to the Gulf Stream. , which is not an easy task.

Research suggests that melting icebergs may have played a larger and more complex role in climate change than previously believed.

“If these regions become abundant in fresh water, the amount of heat carried north by the ocean could weaken dramatically, increasing the chances of Europe cooling down significantly,” the researchers wrote in the statement.

“As we are able to create more detailed computer models, we can actually get more precise characteristics of how the ocean actually flows, how currents move, how they separate and how they rotate.” Hill added.

“It actually makes a big difference in terms of the circulation of fresh water and the actual impact on the climate.”

The results were published in Nature Communication.

Antarctica’s ice caps contain 70% of the world’s fresh water – and sea level would rise 180 feet if it melted

Antarctica contains a huge amount of water.

The three ice caps that cover the continent contain about 70% of our planet’s fresh water – and these are all for warming air and oceans.

If all the ice caps melted due to global warming, Antarctica would raise global sea level by at least 183 feet (56 m).

Given their size, even small losses in the ice caps could have global consequences.

In addition to rising sea levels, meltwater is believed to slow global ocean circulation, while shifting wind belts could affect the climate in the southern hemisphere.

In February 2018, NASA revealed that El Niño events were melting Antarctic sea ice up to 25 centimeters each year.

El Niño and La Niña are separate events that change the water temperature of the Pacific Ocean.

The ocean periodically oscillates between warmer than average during El Niños and colder than average during La Niñas.

Using satellite imagery from NASA, the researchers found that oceanic phenomena cause Antarctic ice shelves to melt while increasing snowfall.

In March 2018, it was revealed that a giant glacier the size of France in Antarctica was floating on the ocean than previously thought.

This has raised concerns that it will melt faster as the climate warms and has a dramatic impact on sea level rise.