Home Glaciers Glacier National Park bear euthanized after car crash

Glacier National Park bear euthanized after car crash

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A black bear (not the one in the photo) was euthanized after a driver struck it on Going-to-the-Sun Road in <a class=Glacier National Park, rangers said.” title=”A black bear (not the one in the photo) was euthanized after a driver struck it on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, rangers said.” loading=”lazy”/>

A black bear (not the one in the photo) was euthanized after a driver struck it on Going-to-the-Sun Road in Glacier National Park, rangers said.

National park service

A a healthy bear was hit by a tourist on a popular scenic drive and had to be euthanized, park rangers said.

The black bear was walking in Glacier National Park on Thursday when a driver struck it, Montana park rangers said. The bear was struck on the famous Going-to-the-Sun Road Scenic Drive.

The bear had “insurmountable traumatic injuries” from the car, and wildlife officials euthanized the bear.

“An autopsy in the field revealed a severely broken jaw, an injured front paw and a potentially damaged rib cage and lungs,” park rangers said in a press release on Monday. “The male bear was 2.5 to 5 years old and appeared otherwise healthy.”

The driver did not report the accident. Park rangers don’t know how the bear was hit, but it was found in an area with thick vegetation near the road.

Vegetation could have masked the bear’s movements and could have contributed to the crash, park rangers said.

“When traveling in the park, it is important to remember that all roads pass through wildlife habitat and that speed limits must be observed for the safety of not only people but wildlife as well,” said the park rangers.

Go to the road of the sun is an 80 km scenic route that takes two hours to drive, according to the National Park Service. Wildlife, especially mountain goats and bighorn sheep, are common along the route.

Park tourists should always report any accidents in the park. Leaving the carcass could attract other wildlife or endanger other tourists, park rangers said.

“Slower speeds give drivers more time to react to movements of wildlife which may be obscured from immediate view,” the rangers said. “If you have a motor vehicle incident in the park, report it to the Ranger or the nearest visitor center.”

This is not the first time that a bear has been struck by a tourist in a national park.

In July, a 6 month old baby bear cub was fatally struck by a car and left on the side of the road to die in Yosemite National Park, according to the Fresno Bee.

“We get that call a lot – too much, to be honest,” the Yosemite rangers said in July. “Bear hit by vehicle, dead on the side of the road.”

Maddie Capron is a McClatchy Real-Time News Reporter focused on the outdoors and wildlife in the Western United States.