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Local artist presented at the municipal library until July

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Throughout July, local artist Dianne Govrox exhibits and sells some of her work at the Strathmore Public Library.

Govrox said the exhibition is the culmination of years of work, much of which was made from sustainable or recycled materials.

“The Strathmore exhibit contains a few pieces that I have made over the years. My latest is the underground series, which shows the different layers of the planet, ”she said. “In these paintings, I used materials… like seashells and I make colors to enhance the image and make it feel like it is underground.

The idea, she added, is to get viewers to think about the environment and their own impacts on it.

“I just want to make people aware that we have a planet that we need to take care of and that things like monitoring our carbon footprint [are] important, ”Govrox explained. “It’s very easy to go to the… craft store and pick up materials, but it’s just as easy to go and reuse materials. This is what I intend to do for all my future paintings.

Another series on display features icebergs created with phosphorescent paint. The series is intended to convey a message of environmental stewardship, similar to Govrox’s underground series.

The third series presented in the exhibition consists of epoxy resin pieces designed to look like cross sections of geodes. Govrox added that they can also be used as tables.

Govrox explained that his initial plan was to open a stand-alone gallery to display and sell his art, but was unable to do so due to the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Instead, when the opportunity arose to exhibit at the library, she jumped at the chance.

“The opportunity presented itself to me to do a show at the library, so I thought, ‘I’m going to try it.’ ”

Govrox also announced that 20% of the revenue generated from its sales will be donated to support the library.

The exhibition will be on display, along with each piece being on sale until July 31. Govrox did not specify which, if any, of his art has sold since the exhibition started, and will count both his income, as well as his donation at the end of the month.

The Strathmore Public Library was contacted, but did not directly comment on the exhibit as the coordinator was unavailable and could not be reached.

US military attempts to build portable nuclear reactors again

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  • In May 2021, the Pentagon requested $ 60 million to design and build a small, portable, truck-mounted nuclear reactor within five years.
  • The US military has already tinkered with such reactors, and its early attempts did not go well in terms of environmental contamination, cost, human health, and international relations.

In a tunnel 40 feet below the surface of the Greenland ice cap, a Geiger counter screamed. It was in 1964, at the height of the Cold War. American soldiers in the tunnel, 800 miles from the North Pole, were dismantling the military’s first portable nuclear reactor.

Commander Joseph Franklin grabbed the radiation detector, ordered his men out, and made a quick investigation before withdrawing from the reactor.

He had spent about two minutes exposed to a radiation field which he estimated at 2,000 rads per hour, enough to make a person sick. Upon his return from Greenland, the military sent Franklin to the Bethesda Naval Hospital. There he set off a whole body radiation meter designed to assess victims of nuclear accidents. Franklin was radioactive.

The military called the reactor portable, even at 330 tons, because it was built from parts that each fit in a C-130 cargo plane. It supplied Camp Century, one of the most unusual military bases.

Camp Century was a series of tunnels built into the Greenland ice cap and used for both military research and science projects. The military boasted that the nuclear reactor there, known as the PM-2A, only needed 44 pounds of uranium to replace a million or more gallons of diesel fuel.

The heat from the reactor turned on the lights and equipment and allowed the approximately 200 men at the camp as many hot showers as they wanted in the brutally cold environment.

The PM-2A was the third child in a family of eight military reactors, several of which were portable nuclear power experiments.

US Army engineers install portable nuclear power plant in Greece

U.S. Army engineers installing a portable nuclear power plant move the steam condenser, a component of the plant, to the plant on October 26, 1960.

Bettmann Archives / Getty Images


A few were unsuitable. The PM-3A, nicknamed Nukey Poo, was stationed at the McMurdo Sound Naval Base in Antarctica. It made a nuclear mess in Antarctica, with 438 malfunctions in 10 years including a cracked and leaking containment vessel.

SL-1, a low-power stationary nuclear reactor in Idaho, exploded during refueling, killing three men. SM-1 is still 12 miles from the White House in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. It cost US $ 2 million to build and cleanup is expected to cost US $ 68 million. The only truly mobile reactor, the ML-1, never really worked.

Almost 60 years after the installation of the PM-2A and the abandonment of Project ML-1, the US military is once again exploring portable nuclear reactors on the ground.

In May 2021, the Pentagon requested $ 60 million for the Pelé project. Its goal: To design and build, within five years, a small, portable, truck-mounted nuclear reactor that could be transported to remote locations and war zones. It could be power on and off for transportation in a few days.

The Navy has a long and most importantly successful history of mobile nuclear power. The first two nuclear submarines, the Nautilus and the Skate, visited the North Pole in 1958, just before the construction of Camp Century. Two more nuclear submarines sank in the 1960s – their reactors sit quietly on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean with two nuclear torpedoes containing plutonium.

Portable reactors on land pose different challenges – no problem lies under thousands of feet of seawater.

Supporters of mobile nuclear power for the battlefield say it will provide nearly unlimited, low-carbon power without the need for vulnerable supply convoys. Others argue that the costs and risks outweigh the benefits. Nuclear proliferation also raises concerns if mobile reactors are able to avoid international inspections.

Leaking reactor on Greenland ice cap

Construction of trenches at Camp Century in Greece

Construction of trenches at Camp Century in 1960.

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers


The PM-2A was built in 18 months. It arrived at Thule Air Force Base in Greenland in July 1960 and was dragged 138 miles through the shattered ice cap, then assembled at Camp Century.

When the reactor first became critical in October, engineers immediately shut it down because the PM-2A leaked neutrons, which can harm people. The military made lead shields and built walls of 55-gallon barrels filled with ice and sawdust in an attempt to protect operators from radiation.

The PM-2A operated for two years, producing electricity and heat without fossil fuels and far more neutrons than was sure.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUVnYKIUEQU

These stray neutrons caused problems. The steel pipes and the reactor vessel became increasingly radioactive over time, as did the traces of sodium in the snow. The cooling water that escaped from the reactor contained dozens of radioactive isotopes potentially exposing personnel to radiation and leaving a legacy in the ice.

When the reactor was dismantled for shipment, its metal pipes released radioactive dust. Bulldozing snow that was once bathed in neutrons from the reactor released radioactive ice flakes.

Franklin must have ingested some of the radioactive isotopes produced by the leaking neutrons. In 2002, she had a prostate and a cancerous kidney removed. In 2015, the cancer spread to his lungs and bones. He died of kidney cancer on March 8, 2017, as a retired, revered and decorated Major General.

Camp Century’s radioactive legacy

Satellite photo of northwestern Greece

Northwestern Greenland, August 12, 2019. On the shores of Baffin Bay is US Thule Air Force Base with Camp Century located 150 miles to the east.

Orbital Horizon / Copernicus Sentinel Data 2019 / Gallo Images via Getty Images


Camp Century was closed in 1967.

During its eight-year life, scientists used the base to drill through the ice sheet and extract an ice core that my colleagues and I still use today to reveal secrets of the ice sheet’s ancient past. Camp Century, its ice core and climate change are at the center of a book I’m writing.

PM-2A was found to be highly radioactive and was buried in an Idaho nuclear waste landfill. Army records of the “hot waste” spill indicate that it left radioactive cooling water buried in a sump in the Greenland ice cap.

When scientists who studied Camp Century in 2016 suggested that global warming now melting Greenland’s ice could expose the camp and its wastes, including lead, fuel oil, PCBs and possibly radiation, by 2100 , relations between the United States, Denmark and Greenland have strained.

Who would be responsible for the cleanup and environmental damage?

Portable nuclear reactors today

Small portable nuclear reactors

Government Accountability Office concepts for the transport and deployment of small portable nuclear reactors.

U.S. Government Accountability Office


There are major differences between nuclear power production in the 1960s and today.

The fuel for the Pele reactor will be sealed in pellets the size of poppy seeds, and it will be air-cooled so that there is no radioactive refrigerant to dispose of.

Being able to produce energy with less greenhouse gas emissions is positive in a warming world. The use of liquid fuel by the US military is similar to that of Portugal or Peru. Not having to deliver so much fuel to remote bases can also help protect lives in dangerous places.

But the United States still lacks a cohesive national strategy for disposing of nuclear waste, and critics wonder what will happen if Pele falls into enemy hands. Researchers from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the National Academy of Sciences have already questioned the risks of terrorist attacks on nuclear reactors.

While the portable reactor proposals will be considered over the next few months, these concerns and others will attract attention.

The US military’s first attempts at land-based portable nuclear reactors did not perform well in terms of environmental contamination, cost, human health, and international relations. This story is worth remembering as the military considers new mobile reactors.

[Get our best science, health and technology stories. Sign up for The Conversation’s science newsletter.]

Paul Bierman, Fellow of the Gund Institute for Environment, Professor of Natural Resources, University of Vermont

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.


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15,000-year-old viruses found in Tibetan glacier ice

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Scientists studying glacier ice have found viruses nearly 15,000 years old in two ice samples taken from the Tibetan Plateau in China. Most of these viruses, which survived because they had remained frozen, do not look like any viruses listed so far.

The results, published today in the journal Microbiome, could help scientists understand how viruses have evolved over the centuries. For this study, scientists also created a new, ultra-clean method of analyzing microbes and viruses in ice without contaminating it.

“These glaciers formed gradually, and along with the dust and gases, many viruses also settled in this ice,” said Zhi-Ping Zhong, lead author of the study and researcher at Ohio State University Byrd Center for Polar and Climate Research which also focuses on microbiology. “Glaciers in western China are not well studied and our goal is to use this information to reflect past environments. And viruses are one of those environments.

The researchers analyzed ice cores taken in 2015 from the Guliya ice cap in western China. Carrots are collected at high altitudes – the summit of Guliya, where this ice comes from, is 22,000 feet above sea level. Ice cores contain layers of ice that build up year after year. year, trapping whatever was in the atmosphere around them when each layer froze. These layers create a sort of timeline, which scientists have used to better understand climate change, microbes, viruses, and gases throughout history.

The researchers determined that the ice was nearly 15,000 years old using a combination of traditional and new techniques to date this ice core.

When they scanned the ice, they found the genetic codes for 33 viruses. Four of these viruses have already been identified by the scientific community. But at least 28 of them are new. About half of them seemed to have survived by the time they were frozen not despite the ice, but because of it.

“These are viruses that would have thrived in extreme environments,” said Matthieu sullivan, co-author of the study, professor of microbiology at Ohio State and Director of Ohio State’s Microbiome Science Center. “These viruses have gene signatures that help them infect cells in cold environments – just surreal genetic signatures for how a virus is able to survive in extreme conditions. These aren’t easy signatures to extract, and the method Zhi-Ping developed to decontaminate carrots and study microbes and viruses in ice could help us search for these genetic sequences in other extreme icy environments – Mars, for example, the moon, or closer to at home in the Atacama Desert on Earth.

Viruses do not share a common and universal gene, so naming a new virus – and trying to figure out where it fits in the landscape of known viruses – involves several steps. To compare unidentified viruses with known viruses, scientists compare sets of genes. Known virus gene sets are cataloged in scientific databases.

These database comparisons showed that four of the viruses in the Guliya ice cap core had previously been identified and belonged to families of viruses that typically infect bacteria. The researchers found the viruses at much lower concentrations than those found in the oceans or soil.

The researchers’ analysis showed that the viruses likely originated from the soil or plants, and not from animals or humans, based on both the environment and databases of known viruses.

The study of viruses in glaciers is relatively new: only two previous studies have identified viruses in the ice of ancient glaciers. But it is an area of ​​science that is becoming increasingly important as the climate changes, said Lonnie Thompson, lead author of the study, distinguished university professor of Earth Science in the state of Ohio ahe principal investigator at the Byrd Center.

“We know very little about viruses and microbes in these extreme environments, and what is actually there,” Thompson said.. “Documenting and understanding this is extremely important: How do bacteria and viruses react to climate change? What happens when we go from an ice age to a warm period like the one we are experiencing now? “

This study was an interdisciplinary effort between the Ohio State Byrd Center and its Center for Microbiome Science. The 2015 Guliya ice cores were collected and analyzed as part of a collaborative program between the Byrd Polar and Climate Research Center and the Institute of Tibetan Plateau Research of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, funded by National Science Foundation of the United States and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. . Funding also came from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the US Department of Energy.

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The US military tried portable nuclear power at remote bases 60 years ago – it didn’t go well

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In a tunnel 40 feet below the surface of the Greenland ice cap, a Geiger counter screamed. It was in 1964, at the height of the Cold War. American soldiers in the tunnel, 800 miles from the North Pole, were dismantling the military’s first portable nuclear reactor.

Commander Joseph Franklin grabbed the radiation detector, ordered his men out, and made a quick investigation before withdrawing from the reactor.

He had spent about two minutes exposed to a radiation field which he estimated at 2,000 rads per hour, enough to make a person sick. Upon his return from Greenland, the military sent Franklin to the Bethesda Naval Hospital. There he set off a whole body radiation meter designed to assess victims of nuclear accidents. Franklin was radioactive.

The military called the reactor portable, even at 330 tons, because it was built from parts that each fit in a C-130 cargo plane. It supplied Camp Century, one of the most unusual military bases.

The Camp Century tunnels began as trenches dug in the ice.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Camp Century was a series of tunnels built into the Greenland ice cap and used for both military research and science projects. The military boasted that the nuclear reactor there, known as the PM-2A, only needed 44 pounds of uranium to replace a million or more gallons of diesel fuel. The heat from the reactor turned on the lights and equipment and allowed the approximately 200 men at the camp as many hot showers as they wanted in the brutally cold environment.

The PM-2A was the third child in a family of eight military reactors, several of which were portable nuclear power experiments.

A few were unsuitable. The PM-3A, nicknamed Nukey Poo, was stationed at the McMurdo Sound Naval Base in Antarctica. It made a nuclear mess in Antarctica, with 438 malfunctions in 10 years including a cracked and leaking containment vessel. SL-1, a low-power stationary nuclear reactor in Idaho, exploded during refueling, killing three men. SM-1 is still 12 miles from the White House in Fort Belvoir, Virginia. It cost US $ 2 million to build and cleanup is expected to cost US $ 68 million. The only truly mobile reactor, the ML-1, never really worked.

A truck with a box on a trailer behind it
The military abandoned its truck-mounted portable reactor program in 1965. This is the ML-1.
U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Almost 60 years after the installation of the PM-2A and the abandonment of Project ML-1, the US military is once again exploring portable nuclear reactors on the ground.

In May 2021, the Pentagon requested $ 60 million for the Pelé project. Its goal: To design and build, within five years, a small, portable, truck-mounted nuclear reactor that could be transported to remote locations and war zones. It could be power on and off for transportation in a few days.

The Navy has a long and most importantly successful history of mobile nuclear power. The first two nuclear submarines, the Nautilus and the Skate, visited the North Pole in 1958, just before the construction of Camp Century. Two more nuclear submarines sank in the 1960s – their reactors sit quietly on the bottom of the Atlantic Ocean with two nuclear torpedoes containing plutonium. Portable reactors on land pose different challenges – no problem lies under thousands of feet of seawater.

Supporters of mobile nuclear power for the battlefield say it will provide nearly unlimited, low-carbon power without the need for vulnerable supply convoys. Others argue that the costs and risks outweigh the benefits. Nuclear proliferation also raises concerns if mobile reactors are able to avoid international inspections.

Leaking reactor on Greenland ice cap

The PM-2A was built in 18 months. It arrived at Thule Air Force Base in Greenland in July 1960 and was dragged 138 miles through the shattered ice cap, then assembled at Camp Century.

When the reactor first became critical in October, engineers immediately shut it down because the PM-2A leaked neutrons, which can harm people. The military made lead shields and built walls of 55-gallon barrels filled with ice and sawdust in an attempt to protect operators from radiation.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kUVnYKIUEQU
“The Big Picture,” an Army television program distributed to US stations, devoted a 1961 episode to Camp Century and the Reactor.

The PM-2A operated for two years, producing electricity and heat without fossil fuels and far more neutrons than was sure.

These stray neutrons caused problems. The steel pipes and the reactor vessel became increasingly radioactive over time, as did the traces of sodium in the snow. The cooling water that escaped from the reactor contained dozens of radioactive isotopes potentially exposing personnel to radiation and leaving a legacy in the ice.

When the reactor was dismantled for shipment, its metal pipes released radioactive dust. Bulldozing snow that was once bathed in neutrons from the reactor released radioactive ice flakes.

Franklin must have ingested some of the radioactive isotopes produced by the leaking neutrons. In 2002, she had a prostate and a cancerous kidney removed. In 2015, the cancer spread to his lungs and bones. He died of kidney cancer on March 8, 2017, as a retired, revered and decorated Major General.

Two men in uniform standing in a hangar.
Joseph Franklin (right) with parts of the decommissioned PM-2A reactor at Thule Air Base.
U.S. Army Photo, Franklin Family, Dignity Memorial

Camp Century’s radioactive legacy

Century Camp was closed in 1967. During its eight-year life, scientists used the base to drill through the ice cap and extract an ice core that my colleagues and I still use today to reveal the secrets of the ice cap’s ancient past. . Camp Century, its ice core and climate change are at the center of a book I’m writing.

PM-2A was found to be highly radioactive and was buried in an Idaho nuclear waste landfill. Army records of the “hot waste” spill indicate that it left radioactive cooling water buried in a sump in the Greenland ice cap.

When scientists who studied Camp Century in 2016 suggested that global warming now melting Greenland’s ice could expose the camp and its wastes, including lead, fuel oil, PCBs and possibly radiation, by 2100 , relations between the United States, Denmark and Greenland have strained. Who would be responsible for the cleanup and environmental damage?

Diagram of the Camp Century reactor in the trenches
A schematic diagram of the Camp Century nuclear reactor in the Greenland ice cap.
US Army Corps of Engineers.

Portable nuclear reactors today

There are major differences between nuclear power production in the 1960s and today.

The fuel for the Pele reactor will be sealed in pellets the size of poppy seeds, and it will be air-cooled so that there is no radioactive refrigerant to dispose of.

Being able to produce energy with less greenhouse gas emissions is positive in a warming world. The use of liquid fuel by the US military is similar to that of Portugal or Peru. Not having to deliver so much fuel to remote bases can also help protect lives in dangerous places.

But the United States still lacks a cohesive national strategy for disposing of nuclear waste, and critics wonder what will happen if Pele falls into enemy hands. Researchers from the Nuclear Regulatory Commission and the National Academy of Sciences have already questioned the risks of terrorist attacks on nuclear reactors. While the portable reactor proposals will be considered over the next few months, these concerns and others will attract attention.

The US military’s first attempts at land-based portable nuclear reactors did not perform well in terms of environmental contamination, cost, human health, and international relations. This story is worth remembering as the military considers new mobile reactors.

[Get our best science, health and technology stories. Sign up for The Conversation’s science newsletter.]


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Kennedy: Marketing the moon will open up opportunities | Chroniclers

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What careers will be needed among those who will be among the first lunar villagers? Almost all careers will be needed by 2040. Many careers will be in high demand, resulting in high profit potential in the short term.

Human life needs food for health and energy. Food requires the need for doctors to measure human health, nutritionists and farmers to cultivate quality food growth, soil preservers and moon miners to extract ice from mineral water and turn it into hydrogen , oxygen and water to survive, without these essential resources carried from Earth.

3D printed housing will be needed on the lunar surface, creating the need for architects, structural and electrical engineers, and builders. These specialists are needed to create the lunar concrete with strength to protect humans from solar and cosmic radiation and the impact of micrometeorites. The Moon Base Village will require autonomous robots and human engineers able to operate, as well as robot maintenance and repair, as demand compromises usability. Lunar habitat interior designers will be needed to make lunar life more livable over time.

Electrical and nuclear engineers will be essential to sustain the high energy demand generated by solar panels and plutonium, or future fusion reactors, to support lunar research habitats and laboratories.

Yes, there will be a need for unique tailors, fashion designers and material scientists – purveyors – to create designer clothes that are more flexible, wearable and comfortable for those crossing the surface of the moon, or just on the go. interior of the lunar village.


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Glacier National Park – The Trek

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Accept brutality. A phrase often used to describe the Continental Divide Trail, the longest and most remote of the United States’ long-distance trails from Canada to Mexico. And, finally, my turn has come to embrace the brutality of this trail.

Or at least mosquitoes. It’s buggy, hot and humid when I leave the Canadian border for Glacier National Park in northern Montana. And incredibly beautiful. Here is the Rockies in all their glory. After a hitch from East Glacier Park Village that took me and Al, my Pacific Crest Trail hiking partner, down a dirt road in the wrong direction, it resulted in a Native American offering ceremony wishing us a safe journey. . We finally arrive and are ready to go.

Glacier National Park

It doesn’t take long before this park completely hit me. Jagged mountains loom all around me and waterfalls from melting snow from snow-capped peaks fall from the huge mountain walls. Calm lakes and roaring rivers with clear blue waters invite me to both bathe and soak my feet and legs in the icy water after a day of hiking. I find myself taking photo after photo and marveling at this magnificent landscape.

Glacier National was established in 1910 and at the time had more than 100 glaciers. Since then, the glaciers have shrunk and by 2015 there were only 26 active glaciers left. And although we walk in a park called Glacier, the trail does not take us through real glaciers.


Other hikers

Our permit and route for the majority of our days in the park has short mileage days, averaging around 15 miles / 25 km, and we’re assigned to specific campgrounds where we need to stay overnight. Our first night in the park, we spend alone at the campsite. And although we had to go four miles off trail the first day (only to go back that four miles the next morning), bushwack and deal with a ton of mosquitoes, the view of the lake is pure magic. . With an easy 15 mile hike and great views at the end of the day, the trail is off to a good start.

Although we are late beginners heading south, it doesn’t take long to find good company with other hikers; Darwin on the Trail, Geared Up, Bopit, Punisher, Heaven, and Scoops all stay at the same campgrounds we do and we meet them on our hike. On my train ride from Chicago to Montana I spotted Bopit and Punisher and it turns out they’ve been on the trail for over a year hiking PCT, AT, ECT, Arizona, and Florida before heading out. do the CDT (that’s some serious track legs and tan lines right there !!). We were also fortunate to have the same start date as Darwin on the trail, known to most in the backpacking community, and his hiking buddy Geared Up who is only a small part of the CDT only to leave and climb Kilimanjaro in a few weeks. All in all, it feels good to be back in the company of other hikers and a brief part of their big adventures.

Grizzly bear country

The trail itself is good for most parts but like Croatia some stretches have a lot of vegetation and overgrowth. Other parts like the Piegan Pass are absolutely fabulous and I enjoy every step. But it is also grizzly bear country and encounters with bears are a serious concern. Hanging up food and other smelly items, wearing bear spray at all times, and making noise as you go are all precautions we take to reduce the risk of encounters. And so I find myself walking around clapping my hands and constantly shouting “Deeeoooo” (apparently that’s the magic word used in the Yukon, Canada to scare away grizzly bears). Hiking here definitely keeps me on my toes and I try to make sure I am aware of my surroundings at all times.

Grizzly bears will be a concern throughout Wyoming and so in the end I’m sure my hands will be sore from all the clapping and my voice will almost be gone after yelling “Deeeooo” the whole time. But so far it’s been fine, and to complete the Glacier experience, we’re ending it with an absolutely amazing dinner at Turtleman in East Glacier. And while I’m sure this trail will bring me to my knees somehow, right now I’m feeling good about my mind and body – and ready to tackle the next section.

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Kraken Robotics (KRKNF) shares drop despite new $ 0.6 million robotics service contract for submarine cable study

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What’s going on with Kraken Robotics?

Shares of Kraken Robotics Inc. (KRKNF) fell after “Canada’s Ocean Company” announced it was awarded a Robotics-as-a-Service contract from Newfoundland and Labrador Hydro (formerly Nalcor Energy) for the marine inspection of the Strait of Bell Isle submarine cable. KRKNF shares were 2.58% and were trading at $ 0.43 per share on Monday afternoon.

The $ 598,871 contract for the cable, which carries electricity to Newfoundland from Labrador, was selected after a competitive bidding process and will be executed in the third quarter of this year. Kraken will deploy its towed SAS sonar system KATFISH, with the Automatic / Remote Launch and Recovery System (ALARS) deployed on the R / V Ocean Seeker.

What does this mean for KRKNF?

The Strait of Bell Isle Cable Passage (SOBI) consists of three HVDC cables installed in three HDD cable conduits on either side of the SOBI which protect the cable from icebergs. Each cable is routed along the seabed between conduit outlets on the seabed at Shoal Cove in Forteau Point, Newfoundland and Labrador.

The contract calls for Kraken to inspect all three cables along the crossing. Each cable route is approximately 31 kilometers long, with 27 kilometers lying on the seabed and four kilometers protected by cable conduits. Kraken Synthetic Aperture Sonar (SAS) technology will provide NALCOR with ultra high resolution 3cm seabed images and 25cm resolution 3D bathymetry.

The R / V Ocean Seeker is based at the Kraken facility in Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. The Ocean Seeker is a state-of-the-art 72ft high-speed catamaran research vessel that contains the Kraken KATFISH, Tentacle Winch and ALARS. Due to the ability of KATFISH to process SAS data in real time, the data will be instantly visible on board the vessel during the investigation and any cable or rock berm anomalies identified will be geotagged allowing additional data to be collected. if necessary. During these survey operations, the Ocean Seeker will perform daily 12 hour operations on SOBI submarine cables.

KRKNF has a Short Term Technical Rank of 30. Find out what that means for you and get the rest of the rank on KRKNF!

Kraken Robotics Inc is a Canadian company engaged in the design, manufacture and sale of software-centric sensors and underwater robotic systems. It operates in the sensors and platforms business segments, namely the design, manufacture, sale and provision of services for underwater sonar and laser scanner sensor equipment and vehicle platform under -marine; and Power which is the design, manufacture and sale of underwater electrical equipment such as drives, thrusters and batteries. The majority of revenue comes from the Sensors and Platforms segment. The company’s products include AquaPix InSAS, KATFISH, ThunderFish, Tentacle Winch and others. Geographically, the group operates in Canada, the United States, France, Italy, Israel, the United Kingdom, Germany and other countries.

Is Antarctica a country? The future of the world’s least understood continent

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(CNN) – Since humans know of its existence, they want to visit Antarctic.

It is the least visited and least populated continent in the world. On the best day, it is extremely difficult to access it. And yet, the attraction of the unknown and the desire to trample all continents underfoot encouraged travelers to try their luck as far as the South Pole.

Yet for obsessive catalogers of the world, Antarctica is difficult to classify. It’s not a country, so can you cross it off a to-do list? Who controls it? If it had a capital, where would it be? What would be the mother tongue?

A national flag for a place without a nation

These are among the questions Evan Townsend asked himself when he signed up for the first of two stays at McMurdo Station, the US base in Antarctica.

Townsend, an elementary school teacher in Boston, knew he had a strict baggage limit when he traveled to Antarctica to work as a support staff member – everyone is limited to 85 pounds, he says , which should include clothing, toiletries, medication, anything they might want or need during their stay.

As one of his tasks would be to manage the base arts and crafts room, he wanted to bring some decorations with him, but knew he had to stay light. Townsend chose the Pride flag – it weighed almost nothing, but its significance was heavy.

One day, Townsend and a few colleagues pulled out the pride flag and took pictures of themselves to post on social media. The photos ended up becoming an international story, with many media claiming the outing was the first-ever Antarctic Pride Parade.

“That’s when I realized the power of flags,” Townsend says. “On the one hand, I am completely isolated at the end of the Earth. And on the other, I am part of this global community.”

The Townsend “True South” flag designed to represent Antarctica

Courtesy of Evan Townsend / True South

Although he had no design background, Townsend identified himself as a longtime “flag nerd” and began to play with the idea of ​​creating a flag to represent Antarctica.

He went with the dark blue for the Southern Ocean waters and white for the landscape, with an isosceles triangle in the center to represent the frozen peaks of Antarctica.

“I wanted it to be a neutral flag for sure,” Townsend says. “It’s a distinct design, it’s a distinct color, to make sure it’s not affiliated with any particular group or nationality. I wanted it to be something that had a lot of symbolism, but it was was simple enough that people could apply their own perception of Antarctica and their own understanding of the continent to the flag. “

Swedish nurse Johanna Davidsson didn’t go to the South Pole in an attempt to break a world record, but she walked away with one anyway.

The name of the flag project, True South, also has its own meaning.

“’True south’ literally means the direction to the geographic south pole, as opposed to magnetic south that would lead to the magnetic south pole,” Townsend explains. “it is meant to represent the shared goals and values ​​by which the Antarctic community can orient itself.”

And Townsend has no plans to trademark or copyright the design of the flag because he believes it should belong to the whole world.

“The best flags are flags that derive their meaning and power from the people who wear them,” he adds.

Who’s in charge here, anyway?

Townsend is just one of the many people around the world who are fascinated by Antarctica, even though they are never able to visit and see the place for themselves.

So what is it in the southernmost continent that continues to draw people in?

In a world more interconnected than ever, Antarctica remains one of the few places most people know nothing about.

There is no indigenous population in Antarctica and human activity there is still relatively recent.

The only permanent facilities are a handful of science stations, which employ only scientists and their support staff – a term including anyone from chefs and maintenance workers to electricians and airport managers.

It is common for people to be multitasking. Townsend worked in food service, as a bartender, and as a craft room manager during his tenure. At its peak, the number of human residents of Antarctica was around 10,000.

In 1959, 12 countries – including Japan, South Africa, France, the United Kingdom, Argentina and what was then the USSR – signed the Antarctic Treaty in Washington, DC.

Among the points they agreed on was that Antarctica should “be used for peaceful purposes only” and that science would be at the forefront of any development or establishment there. Military personnel are allowed to be there, but only in support roles.

Although few people live there, the extent of Antarctica’s influence is immense. Climate change has made the continent shrink. And despite the existence of the treaty, global politics have changed and powerful new players – namely China – have emerged in Antarctica.

Ceremonial South Pole

The True South flag flies alongside the flags of the 12 original Antarctic Treaty signatories at the ceremonial South Pole.

Courtesy of Lisa Minelli / True South

Klaus Dodds, professor of geopolitics at the University of London, is the author of several books on the polar regions, most recently “The Arctic: A Very Short Introduction”, co-authored with Jamie Woodward.

“Things keep being taken from Antarctica. Information, ice, resources like seals, whales and fish,” he says. “The fragility of Antarctica, I think, represents the fragility of the rest of the world.”

While climate change is the biggest influence on Antarctica, there is another major factor that will only increase as the pandemic recedes: tourism.

The future of the seventh continent

About 90% of tourists to Antarctica come by boat. These trips are expensive, and most travelers only spend a few hours ashore before getting back on the ships and turning around.

Currently, the United States is the main source of tourism in Antarctica, but China is quickly rising to second place and Dodds believes it will be at the top of the list in a decade.

Certain destinations, such as the seaside resort of Argentina Ushuaia and Australia Hobart, earn money with these tourists because of their location as pre-Antarctic ports of call. Dodds predicts that the next decade will see several cruise lines opening routes to Antarctica and more travel companies will invest in the continent’s infrastructure.

Just as countries vie for power with military bases and political maneuvers, Antarctica has become another site for their rivalries – and fears – to play out.

“No one can answer the question (of) who owns Antarctica,” says Dodds.

“I think Antarctica represents, in essence, not only the idealism that the treaty represents, but it also represents the supreme and contradictory nature of humanity in general. So for all the things we want to celebrate in Antarctica , there is also the ugliness of humanity. “

He points to some major successes: Antarctica was the first continent to be completely free of nuclear weapons. He is also demilitarized.

Another example of the continent’s potential for beauty and unity? The True South flag, which Dodds admires.

“(It’s) a well-meaning reminder that Antarctica is a wonder. Antarctica should represent the best of us all.”


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Russia to allocate more than $ 13.4 million to complete construction of North Pole research platform

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MOSCOW (UrduPoint News / Sputnik – July 19, 2021) The Russian government will allocate more than one billion rubles (approximately $ 13.4 million) towards the completion of the construction of the self-propelled and ice-resistant platform of the North Pole for Arctic exploration, Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin said on Monday.

The government will further allocate more than one billion rubles to complete the construction of the ice-resistant self-propelled platform. It is called the ‘North Pole’ for a reason. The platform can be both on ice and in water, like walking alone in water, ”Mishustin said in a meeting with deputy prime ministers.

This is a new approach to long-term scientific research in the Arctic, as all the polar stations sit on ice, which has thinned considerably and does not allow expeditions to last longer. one year, added the Prime Minister.

The North Pole All-Season Drift Research Station is intended to conduct complex scientific research throughout the year in the Arctic Ocean. A specialized vessel will carry a crew of up to 14 people and up to 48 scientists. It will be able to carry out geological, acoustic, geophysical and oceanographic observations, move in the ice without involving the icebreaker, and be able to take heavy Mi-8AMT type helicopters to its helipad.

The laying ceremony took place at the Admiralty Shipyards in St. Petersburg in 2019. Sea trials are scheduled for 2022.


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Russian government has allocated over 1 billion rubles to complete Arctic North Pole research vessel

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The funds will help complete construction of the floating platform in 2021 and conduct shipbuilder and dockside trials in 2022

Photo credit: USC

More than RUB 1 billion rubles will be allocated to Roshydromet to finance the completion of the “North Pole” (Severny Polyus), an ice-resistant self-propelled platform (LSP). The order was signed by Prime Minister Mikhail Mishustin, the government press office said.

Project 00903’s North Pole Arctic research vessel was commissioned by the Russian Federal Hydrometeorology and Environmental Monitoring Service as part of the State Program on Social and Economic Development of the Arctic Zone.

The new self-propelled anti-freeze platform will be able to operate both on ice and in water. This will allow Russian polar explorers to resume long-term drifting expeditions that were interrupted due to climate change in the early 2000s, which resulted in a decrease in ice thickness in the Arctic.

The 83 m North Pole will accommodate more people than in traditional drifting stations and more equipment for scientific research. The results of these studies are important for understanding global climate change processes, as well as for preparing and implementing plans for Arctic development and ensuring the functioning of the Northern Sea Route (NSR).

The issue was discussed at a meeting with deputy prime ministers on July 19.

The North Pole (Severny Polyus) was launched at “Admiralty Shipyards” (part of USC) on December 18, 2020.

The North Pole antifreeze platform will resume the traditional operation of drift stations in the Arctic region. Previously, icebergs were used for polar expeditions and scientists had to deploy manned stations directly on the pack ice. For the first time, such a landing followed by a polar station was carried out by Soviet researchers in 1937. The expedition was called the “North Pole”. The same name was given to the new arctic research vessel under construction at the shipyard.

Specifications: LHT: 83.1 m; width: 22.5 m; draft: 8.6 m; displacement: more than 10,000 t; power unit: 4,200 kW; speed: at least 10 knots; shell strength – Arc8; fuel endurance: approximately 2 years; lifespan: at least 25 years; crew – 14; scientific staff – 34. Class notation: KM[1] Arc5

AUT1-C HELIDECK-F Special vessel of the Russian maritime register.

Earlier, the Minister of Natural Resources and Environment of the Russian Federation Alexander Kozlov reported at the International Arctic Forum “Arctic and Antarctic Days in Moscow”, the Ministry of Natural Resources plans that the self-propelled ice-resistant platform “North Pole” will enter service in 2024.


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