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Crossword of the day: Underwater cities when glaciers disappear?

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A massive glacier in the Patagonia region of South America.
Image credit: photo / Pixabay

Long before the dawn of humanity, icy bulldozers slowly swept parts of the world, carving landforms like lakes and fjords. Glaciers are massive ancient bodies of ice and snow – and some of the coldest things on planet Earth.

Click start to play today’s crossword puzzle – our coldest yet – where you have to name other frigid things from around the world.

Not all pieces of old ice can be called a glacier. The minimum required size is 0.1 square kilometer – that’s the size of 19 football fields! The Lambert Glacier in Antarctica is the largest form of ice in the world, and is 96 km wide and 434 km long.

Although shaped like rivers, glaciers are in fact considered to be the largest reservoirs of fresh water in the world. They contain 69% of the world’s freshwater supply.

The United States Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that the oldest glacial ice in Antarctica may be nearly a million years old! At the height of the last Ice Age, glaciers covered about a third of the Earth’s land area. Today, they cover about 10 percent.

As global warming increases, glaciers are melting rapidly and contributing to sea level rise, which in turn has devastating effects on coastal erosion and ocean temperatures. According to the World Wide Fund for Nature (WWF), when it comes to sea ice, 95% of the oldest and thickest ice in the Arctic has already disappeared. The Greenland ice sheet is also disappearing four times faster than in 2003 and is responsible for 20 percent of the current sea level rise.

We desperately need glaciers to remain the solid, seemingly still structures that they have been for millennia. The USGS website explains what would happen if all of Earth’s glaciers and ice caps melted: Global sea level would rise by about 230 feet, inundating every coastal city on the planet.

Let’s take root in the colder regions of the Earth. Play today’s crossword puzzle and let us know if you enjoyed it at [email protected]


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Scientists surprised to see 3 rare successive thunderstorms in northern Alaska |

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Meteorologists were surprised this week when three successive thunderstorms swept through the icy Arctic from Siberia to northern Alaska, triggering lightning in an unusual phenomenon, Reuters reports. But scientists say this phenomenon will become less rare with global warming. The thunderstorms had started on Saturday.

“Forecasters have never seen anything like this before,” said Ed Plumb, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Fairbanks, of the storms that started on Saturday.

Typically, the air over the Arctic Ocean, especially when the water is covered with ice, does not have the convective heat necessary to generate thunderstorms. But as climate change warms the Arctic faster than the rest of the world, that is changing, scientists say.

Summer lightning episodes in the Arctic Circle have tripled since 2010, a trend directly linked to climate change and increasing sea ice loss in the High North, scientists reported in a March study published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters. As sea ice disappears, more water can evaporate, adding moisture to the warming atmosphere.

“It’s going to go with the temperatures,” said co-author Robert Holzworth, atmospheric physicist at the University of Washington in Seattle. These electrical storms threaten the boreal forests bordering the Arctic as they start fires in remote areas that are already baking in the summer sun 24 hours a day.

Boreal Siberia in Russia receives more lightning than any other arctic region, Holzworth said. The document also documented more frequent lightning over the treeless tundra regions of the Arctic, as well as over the Arctic Ocean and pack ice.

In August 2019, lightning even struck less than 100 kilometers from the North Pole, the researchers found. In Alaska alone, thunderstorm activity is set to triple by the turn of the century if current climate trends continue, according to two studies by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., Published l last year in the journal Climate Dynamics.

Reuters


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Central Massachusetts native combines science and art to fight climate change

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“When you first meet Jill, you don’t see her all,” says Lynne Pelto, the mother-in-law of climate change artist Jill Pelto. “You really have to spend time with her to get to know her. She’s very deep and there is so much about her that is valuable. It takes time to get to know someone like that.

Jill, who grew up in Worcester and West Boylston and earned a BA in Studio Art and Earth Sciences and an MS from the University of Maine, has mastered the art of communicating science through art. Now in her twenties, she lives outside of Portland, Maine.

Pelto’s watercolors range from a profusion of orange flames, black smoke, and gray trees during a forest fire; a menagerie of wild animals; to a self-portrait, as she stands on the edge of a deep crevasse on a blindingly white glacier.

His interests in science and art began at a young age, and they naturally integrated over time. His father, Mauri Pelto, Dean of Nichols College at Dudley, is a research scientist and internationally renowned expert on glaciers and climate change. Jill regularly accompanied him on his annual August trip to a glacier in Washington, where, for decades, he made detailed measurements of ice retreat over time.

Pelto's watercolor titled
The cover of Time's climate issue in July 2020.

Jill’s art was heavily influenced by the time she spent on these research trips with her father. “I’ve been to Washington every summer with him and still do,” she says, adding that his hands-on experiences have made a difference.

“August 2015 was my most dramatic experience with climate change. The drought in the western United States and the wildfires were very serious that year and just being there and seeing the effects on this place I had been to for some time has was a very moving experience for me, ”she recalls.

“The lack of snow on the glaciers, the exposed bare ice, the retreat of the glaciers from the previous year, the low reservoirs and streams and the fact that I was often smoky really made me want to go back to school.” in Maine and communicate. what I had seen to my peers.

Pelto is not just a fragment of the ancient glacier. In addition to browsing the ancient ice with measuring tools, she brings her sketchbook. Thanks to these two activities, she reached her own heights, culminating in the appearance last July of her watercolor “Currents” on the cover of Time. https://time.com/magazine/us/5864669/july-20th-2020-vol-196-no-3-us/

The magazine’s special edition, devoted to climate change, titled “One Last Chance,” had Pelto’s work brilliantly depicting a rising ocean encroaching on a bottom of broken glacial ice and a stand of deep green trees. The table also included information boxes referring to CO2 emissions and rising temperatures, as well as sea level rise and renewable energy consumption.

In addition to bringing his tools to measure glacial change, Pelto brings his sketchbook.

During these previous research trips to Washington, Mauri had encouraged Jill to communicate what they were experiencing on the glaciers through her artistic voice. “I said to him, ‘If you can express what we do through art, you can explain to more people what we see.’ It took her four or five years to figure out how she was going to do it, ”says Mauri.

“To me, integrating data seemed almost too obvious because I’m used, as a science major, to look at data and think it tells a really clear and useful story,” explains Jill. “But I realized that when you’re not trained that way, sometimes the data can be more overwhelming or something people ignore. So it can be powerful to combine with visuals to tell the story and help make it a bit clearer for people.

Temperature variability in the Gulf of Maine, by Jill Pelto

His article “Gulf of Maine Temperature Variability” shows not only how oceanic species in the Gulf are affected by rising temperatures, but also how we humans are. The exhibit shows data on temperature fluctuations on the coast of Maine. Below the data is an ocean scene with shrimp, clams, lobster, and cod. Cod becomes less vivid in color as it moves across the room. Humans are represented by the boat which is obstructed by data points.

“I like to do detailed work like the small species in this piece and have more realistic aspects associated with the abstract design work that I do with watercolor,” Jill says. “I’m happy with the way I told this story showing all of these different species and how climate change will affect them all.”

Jill pelto

While marketing her paintings, Jill received continuing education in the art field. What drove her art to cover the issue of Time was her networking skills, she said, which ultimately got her noticed by the magazine’s creative director.

“It’s important to look for opportunities, whether it’s being featured in an article or having your work in a gallery,” she emphasizes. “One of the first art exhibitions I had was in a store that I really liked. I knew they were doing concerts, so I contacted them and they gave me room in the back room.

Jill’s stepmother Lynne Pelto says the young artist has come a long way.

“When I first met her she was a shy 10 year old little girl who barely spoke above a whisper, and now she’s networking, she’s got her art on the cover of Time Magazine, and she sells her paintings. “

“Jill didn’t hesitate to try new things,” adds her father. “She wasn’t afraid of not being good at something.”


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Auckland Winter Festival Elemental AKL underway with music, food and art

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These igloo-shaped “Snugs” can be booked as private dining areas in Aotea Square during Elemental AKL. Photo / Supplied

Time to get out of your winter hibernation, Auckland.

Elemental AKL is back for a third year, bringing a mix of over 50 free and paid events and experiences across the city.

The mid-winter festival started on Wednesday and continues until August 1.

The center of activity is the Winter Playground in Aotea Square, where an ice rink and slide already attracts hundreds of skaters every day, according to Auckland Live.

Five domes where up to eight people can dine privately, known as The Snugs, are also back.

Equipped with comfy furniture, blankets and heaters, the five eye-catching geodesic domes are the perfect places to kick back and relax during the coziest winter gatherings with friends, team lunches, parties. birthday or pre-show meals. “

Reservations can be made at heartofthecity.co.nz/auckland-events/snugs

The world is still inaccessible to most of us, but luckily its tastes remain close at hand with Auckland’s night markets featuring authentic international cuisine, from Hungarian flatbread to churros.

Angus Muir Mountain of Light at Heard Park, Parnell Rd, Parnell.  Photo / Michael Craig
Angus Muir Mountain of Light at Heard Park, Parnell Rd, Parnell. Photo / Michael Craig

It is possible to eat take out, alfresco in the square or inside a reserved Snug.

And if people-watching isn’t enough entertainment, Auckland Live’s digital stage features projections of the Southern Ocean adventure, Go Further South, featuring penguins, killer whales and icebergs, while the cameras take you on a virtual journey through the landscapes of the icy submarine. -Antarctic.

Orchestral rave Synthony – where a full orchestra, live DJs and singers mix the magic of lights and lasers with some of the most beloved dance tracks of the past 30 years – has a one-night show at Spark Arena

tonight.

Synthony, a dance event involving a full orchestra, DJs, live singers, lights and lasers, sold out during Elemental AKL last year.  It's back in town tonight.  Photo / Supplied
Synthony, a dance event involving a full orchestra, DJs, live singers, lights and lasers, sold out during Elemental AKL last year. It’s back in town tonight. Photo / Supplied

Meanwhile, subways and buses will be free after 9 p.m., until that day’s service ends, throughout the festival, Auckland Transport said.

Face coverings must be worn on public transport.

The free services were a great way to get home safely after enjoying their evening at an Elemental event, said Inspector Siaosi (George) Fanamanu, Auckland District Traffic Police Director.

“We don’t want people to drink and then make the wrong decision to drive, endangering their passengers and other road users.

“There is always an alternative to drunk driving, so plan your trip home ahead of time. “

Takarua - Battle of the Brothers is an evening of dinner theater, inspired by ancient performances and hospitality in Maori and Pasifika traditions.  Photo / Supplied
Takarua – Battle of the Brothers is an evening of dinner theater, inspired by ancient performances and hospitality in Maori and Pasifika traditions. Photo / Supplied

Back in Aotea Square, the Takurua – Battle of the Brothers dinner theater offers a banquet of neo-Pasifika cuisine by a team of the best Pasifika chefs in the city, led by Wallace Mua Frost from Euro Bar and Restaurant, and accompanied by demonstrations of Maori martial arts and contemporary Pasifika dance.

For those who wish to soak up the sun, Winter Forage at the end of the month begins with a guided city walk that includes learning about the plants, leaves and berries that can be eaten, as well as knowledge of the harvesting traditions of maori food.

Exhibitions, dinner tastings, live music, art trails and harbor cruises are also planned over the next two weeks, with more information about the festival at www.aucklandnz.com/elementalfestival

The Auckland Harbor Bridge also lit up last night for vector lights for Elemental AKL, with light and sound shows continuing every half hour between 6 p.m. and midnight through July 31.

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The soundtrack is available on www.vector.co.nz/about-us/sponsorship/lights, with Little Shoal Bay in Northcote, Bayswater Marina, Bastion Point, Mt Eden, Harbor View Beach Reserve in Te Atatū and the Auckland waterfront among the places where the light show is best seen.

Rare arctic lightning storms hit northern Alaska

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Meteorologists were stunned this week when three successive thunderstorms swept through the icy Arctic from Siberia to northern Alaska, triggering lightning in an unusual phenomenon that scientists say will become less rare with global warming.

“Forecasters have never seen anything like this before,” said Ed Plumb, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service in Fairbanks, of the storms that started on Saturday.

Typically, the air over the Arctic Ocean, especially when the water is covered with ice, does not have the convective heat necessary to generate thunderstorms. But as climate change warms the Arctic faster than the rest of the world, that is changing, scientists say.

Tripling in frequency

Summer lightning episodes in the Arctic Circle have tripled since 2010, a trend directly linked to climate change and increasing sea ice loss in the High North, scientists reported in a March study published in review. Geophysical research letters. As sea ice disappears, more water can evaporate, adding moisture to the warming atmosphere.

“It’s going to go along with the temperatures,” said co-author Robert Holzworth, atmospheric physicist at the University of Washington in Seattle.

These electrical storms threaten the boreal forests bordering the Arctic as they start fires in remote areas that are already baking in the summer sun 24 hours a day.

The document also documented more frequent lightning over arctic treeless tundra regions, as well as over the Arctic Ocean and pack ice. In August 2019, lightning even struck less than 100 kilometers from the North Pole, the researchers found.

In Alaska alone, thunderstorm activity is set to triple by the turn of the century if current climate trends continue, according to two studies by scientists at the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Boulder, Colo., Published l last year in the review. Climate dynamics.

“What was very rare now is just plain rare,” said Rick Thoman, climatologist at the University of Alaska Fairbanks. As the Arctic Storm Parade demonstrated this week, lightning is already appearing in unexpected places, he said. “I have no recollection of three consecutive days of this sort of thing” in the Arctic.

On the water

On the water, lightning is a growing danger to sailors, and shipping traffic increases as the sea ice recedes, Holzworth said.

People can become lightning rods and usually try to stoop for safety reasons. It is difficult to do on a flat tundra or an expanse of ocean. “What you really need is to pay more attention to the lightning forecast,” he said.


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Siachen Glacier – WorldAtlas

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The Siachen Glacier, the second longest glacier in the world in non-polar areas, is found in the Karakoram Range of the Himalayas in the disputed region of Kashmir. The glacier covers 76 km from its head at the Indira Pass on the Sino-Indian border to its terminus, its altitude rising from 5,753 m to 3,620 m above sea level. The Siachen Glacier is bordered to the north by the great drainage ditch, a ditch separating the Indian subcontinent and the Eurasian plate in the Karakoram region. Although India administers the entire glacier region as part of the Ladakh Union Territory, Pakistan also claims the region and controls the area west of the glacier.

Geography

Siachen Glacier. Image Credit: Danokhan / Wikimedia Commons

At 76 kilometers, the Siachen Glacier is the longest glacier in the Karakoram range and the second longest non-polar glacier in the world. The glacier lies east of the main Karakoram range and west of the Saltoro ridge, falling from an elevation of 5,753m at its head in the Indira Pass to 3,620m at the end point. It lies northeast of the northernmost point of the Pakistan-India line of control in the disputed region of Kashmir. The glacial system covers an area of ​​approximately 700 km², separating Central Asia from the Indian subcontinent.

The Siachen Glacier region experiences extremely cold climatic conditions, with temperatures dropping to -50 ° C. Winter snowfalls exceed 1,000 cm, with the area experiencing high winds and avalanches. The Siachen Glacier is the main source of the 80 km long Nubra River, a major tributary of the Shyok River. The Shyok River feeds the 3,180 km long Indus River, which is the water source for the world’s largest irrigation system.

Litigation and conflict

Siachen Glacier
The Siachen region is the subject of a territorial dispute between India and Pakistan.

The Siachen region is the subject of a territorial dispute between Pakistan and India, with the two countries claiming sovereignty over it. US and Pakistani maps from the 1970s and 1980s contained a dotted line on the LoC from NJ9842 to Karakoram Pass. However, India felt that the dotted line violated the Shimla Agreement and may be a mapping error. India took control of the Siachen Glacier in 1984 as part of Operation Meghdoot after obtaining information about Pakistan’s plans to occupy the region. Pakistani troops reached the area and discovered that India had already occupied the glacier, including the Saltoro Ridge.

The Siachen Glacier is considered the highest battlefield in the world, with India and Pakistan fighting there since 1984. Troops from both countries have maintained their presence in the region up to an altitude of over 6,000. mr. However, both countries have lost more troops due to the harsh climate than the conflict itself. According to Indian authorities, the country has lost 869 soldiers in the Siachen Glacier between 1984 and today due to harsh weather conditions. Due to the high cost of military outposts, India and Pakistan wish to resolve the territorial dispute. However, India insists that Pakistan must recognize the current line of control in order for it to withdraw from the region.

Environmental concerns

The strong military presence is a major threat due to melting glaciers and pollution. Both troops depend on glacial ice as their primary source of water for their livelihood. However, they use chemicals to cut and melt glacial ice. In addition, troops also dump large amounts of garbage, including non-biodegradable material. Thus, the presence of military personnel on the glacier is the main cause of glacial retreat. According to a study by the Pakistan Meteorological Department, the size of glaciers has shrunk by about 35% and is currently shrinking by 110 meters per year. Military activities have also affected the flora and fauna of the region, with nearly every species at risk, including the snow leopard, ibex, and brown bear, found here.


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Post offers thin evidence Antarctica is not losing ice

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The statement

A post on Facebook claims Antarctica is not losing ice as a number of bases at the UK research station have already been destroyed by the accumulation of snow.

The July 1 post through Ken Ring, an astrological meteorologist from New Zealand, features a photo of the UK’s Halley VI Antarctic Research Station. Its caption states: “There have been five previous bases at Halley, all now covered in rising snow, giving (sic) the lie that the ice of Antarctica is disappearing.”

He goes on to say: “The truth about the snowfall in Antarctica is hidden from the world, lest the public (sic) learn that ‘global warming’ is nonsense.”

The post also predicts that Antarctica could experience some of its lowest temperatures on record this winter.

One article claims that global warming is “nonsense”, pointing to the accumulation of snow in Antarctica as evidence.

Analysis

While several British bases in Halley have been destroyed by the accumulation of snow, this fact is not related to the disappearance of the Antarctic ice or to climate change.

Several experts said AAP fact check the bases were built on top of the ice caps away from where the ice melts or breaks off, which covers them with ice and snow during regular accumulation. However, Antarctica is generally losing land ice.

The Halley base of the British Antarctic Survey (BAS) was established in 1956 and is used for research in atmospheric science, geology and glaciology. Since then there have been five bases – including the current Halley VI base – all built on the Brunt Ice Shelf. Four of them were eventually made uninhabitable.

The shelf records about 1.2 meters of snow per year, which forces the bases to be rebuilt periodically as they become covered in snow and crash, according to the BAS.

André Berger, a professor of Earth observation at the University of Leeds with expertise in polar and climate sciences, said FactCheck AAP that Antarctic bases like Halley only experienced snowfall when they were placed over the ice cap, where little melting or ice breaking occurred.

“Anything that is placed above the ice cap will be buried over time and eventually end up at the base or edge (by the movement of ice carrying older ice towards the edge) where it will melt. or will be released, “Professor Shepherd said in an email.

Ian simmonds, professor at the School of Earth Sciences at the University of Melbourne, agreed, stating FactCheck AAP in an email: “Precipitation is falling on the continent and that means that in most places above Antarctica, objects on the surface will eventually be buried. While this is true, it in itself has nothing to do with the argument that the continent is gaining in mass. “

For the claim that the disappearance of Antarctic ice is a “lie”, experts said there is a consensus backed by scientific evidence to show that Antarctica is losing ice.

Professor Shepherd described the post as misleading as it appeared to be based solely on Antarctic snowfall, which he said was only half the story.

“Antarctica receives around 2,098 billion tonnes of snow each year (1979-2008 average), but it also loses around 2,306 billion tonnes per year (2009-2017 average) due to the calving of icebergs on the shore and the melting ice at the base. he said.

“So it’s losing 208 billion tonnes of ice a year overall, which means it’s shrinking instead of growing.”

Professor Rob DeConto, a polar climate change expert at the University of Massachusetts, said Antarctica is losing ice “at a breakneck rate.”

“The rate of ice loss is accelerating (demonstrated by several data sources and with a high level of confidence). The rate of ice loss has tripled during the decade 2007-2017, compared to the previous decade, mainly in response to the change in ice sheet flow triggered by warm ocean waters in contact with the edge of the ice sheet, ”he said AAP fact check in an email.

The United States-based National Snow and Ice Data Center says the Antarctic Peninsula is experiencing ice loss as it has warmed by 2.5 degrees Celsius since 1950, while much of the West Antarctic Ice Cap also loses mass.

NASA satellite data indicates that the Antarctic ice sheet loses 151 billion tonnes of ice per year, the organization says. The ice cap is the biggest store frozen freshwater in the world.

Professor Simmonds identified that the term “Antarctic ice” can be defined by three main categories: the ice cap covering the land and bedrock of Antarctica; sea ​​ice, which floats on the ocean; and pack ice, permanent floating ice caps connected to the Antarctic landmass.

Of these, only sea ice levels have remained relatively stable, according to UK data Royal Society, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Nasa. Professor Simmonds said sea ice levels in Antarctica rose until about 2015, but have since started to decline.

Experts have also disputed the claim that Antarctica may record some of its lowest temperatures this winter.

Professor Simmonds said parts of Antarctica have recently experienced unusually cold weather due to a Polar vortex, it’s part of the natural climate system.

“It is naive to choose an isolated event (in time and / or in space) to make a general statement about the whole climate system,” he said.

Likewise, Professor Chris Rapley, climatology and polar science expert at University College London and former director of British Antarctic Inquiry, Told FactCheck AAP that “a swallow does not make summer”.

“If there has been or is expected to be an extreme low, that does not invalidate a trend,” he said in an email.

A scientific article co-authored by Professor Simmonds details a global warming trend over the entire Antarctic continent from 1950 to 2020 (Figure 1a), while the The World Meteorological Organization recognized a new Antarctic temperature record of 18.3 ° C this month.

FactCheck AAP asked for Mr. Ring’s comment on the Facebook post but received no response.

Antarctic ice loss rate is accelerating, polar climate change expert told AAP FactCheck

The verdict

The destruction of the British Antarctic Survey’s Halley research stations by snowfall is not linked to global warming or the disappearance of Antarctic ice. Rather, anything placed on the Antarctic ice sheet will be buried by regular snowfall over time. Overall, Antarctica is losing ice, according to experts and various monitoring organizations.

False – Content that has no factual basis.

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Shooting investigation involving an officer in progress near Glacier NP

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UPDATE: 3:55 p.m. – July 15, 2021

WEST GLACIER – A shootout involving an officer implicating a homicide suspect took place Thursday morning, closing Highway 2 at West Glacier to all traffic

The shooting involved a Great Falls homicide suspect and a kidnapping that took place around 12:30 am Thursday. Law enforcement learned of the suspect’s whereabouts in Flathead County, near Glacier National Park at around 5 a.m.

MTN News

Flathead County Sheriff Brian Heino told MTN News that officers approached the suspect near the Cascadilla Flat River access off Highway 2, where the suspect brandished a gun. fire before being shot.

“One of the law enforcement agencies involved ended up shooting the suspect, so an investigation into a shooting involving an officer is ongoing.”

Heino said the kidnapping victim was taken away safely and without injury.

OIS Glacier

Sean Wells / MTN News

The incident closed Highway 2 between West Glacier and East Glacier until 1:20 p.m. Thursday.

Sheriff Heino said several law enforcement agencies were working closely to close the freeway, ensuring the safety of all residents of Flathead.

“The great transmission of information that made it possible to shut this down before other people got hurt or injured,” Sheriff Heino said.

The Criminal Investigation Division was called in to investigate the incident, a standard procedure for shootings involving officers.

EXTRA WEB: Sheriff Brian Heino


(first report: 11:27 a.m. – July 15, 2021)

An investigation continues after law enforcement shot dead a person Thursday morning near Glacier National Park.

The incident began with a fatal shooting and kidnapping in Great Falls.

The Great Falls Police Department reports that officers were called for domestic disturbances around 12:30 a.m. in the 3000 block of 6th Street NE.

One person was found dead and law enforcement learned the suspect had taken a hostage and fled Cascade County.

OIS Shooting Glacier

MTN News

One chase ended in a shootout involving an officer at the Cascadilla River access off U.S. Highway 2, Flathead County Sheriff Brian Heino told MTN News.

The road was closed between West Glacier and East Glacier for several hours due to an investigation into the fatal shooting.

Watch Sheriff Heino’s full interview below.

EXTRA WEB: Sheriff Brian Heino

We will have more information as it becomes available.

– information from David Sherman and Sean Wells included in this report.


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‘So much Chapstick’: Denali base camp worker reflects on her first year on the glacier

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Lisa Roderick (left) and Gabby Faurot at Talkeetna State Airport. (Colleen Coulon Love / KTNA)

Kahiltna Base Camp was taken down last week, marking the end of the 2021 climbing season on Denali.

Kahiltna is the name of the glacier where climbers begin and end their journey. The teams are transported to the glacier by one of the local Talkeetna air services before the climbers are checked in to base camp by someone who, for three months, works and lives on the glacier.

This year, Lisa Roderick, longtime head of the base camp, has alternated the management of the camp with the new assistant Gabby Faurot. Faurot grew up around Denali, climbing and camping in the Alaska Range with his father, Chip.

Lisa Roderick, longtime base camp manager, in front of her tent in 2018 (Katie Writer / KTNA)

At the height of the climbing season, base camp officials may have 100 climbers at a time eager to return to Talkeetna for a shower and a hot meal. During these weeks, keeping an agenda for thefts out of reach is an important task for the base camp manager.

“I find it hard to assert myself and it’s a job you have to be assertive,” said Faurot. “People came and they faced me saying they wanted to leave, and I just had to put him in danger. Like, ‘Hey, you can’t go out now. No one is going to fly to pick you up because the weather is bad. ‘ “

She said she had learned a few tips for curing climbers’ frustrations.

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“I once played Frisbee with people and it relaxed them a bit, they were a bit happier, but the lemonade really does the trick. Just give them a glass of lemonade, sit down, ask them how their trip went, ”she said.

The base camp is funded by the Air Association of Talkeetna. K2 Aviation and Talkeetna Air Taxi each collect a small fee from the customers they fly with to climb Denali. Air taxis then send this money to the Air Association, which pays for base camp expenses.

Faurot described some of the tasks she performs on the glacier.

“I talk to the pilots, I let them know what the weather is like, I talk to the climbers, I introduce them to base camp, I give them their fuel, I get them on their planes when they return,” he said. she declared. “You have a record of everyone, their license number, the name of their team, the amount of fuel they paid for, the type of communication they have and their routes – then their scheduled release date so that we can sort of keep an eye on that. “

One of the most important aspects of the job is communicating the weather to air taxis so they can get climbers in and out of the range. Faurot found that she was developing fairly good forecasting skills.

RELATED: Park Service rangers describe unsettling drive as hundreds of climbers try Denali

“It’s all about the role models out there,” she said. “Especially with the fog, you would notice when the breezes would come in and when it started to clear, then I was able to pay more attention to the wind patterns, and if I felt a certain type of wind, I would know that hey, maybe it’ll go away in fifteen minutes. “

As with any new job, sometimes it’s hard to know what is most essential. And having a good support system is crucial when you find that you don’t have what you need.

“I need Chapstick so badly,” Faurot said. “My lips are getting really dry over there. It’s so sunny. I must have flown a plane with a tube at one point because my lips started to split the first week, or the first two weeks I was there. And the girls at Spinach Bread would send me a burrito every now and then and it was really, really nice.

In early July, the snow on Denali softens and makes it difficult for climbers to travel. Climbers usually aim to complete their expeditions before this happens. Faurot explains what motivates the decision to put away the base camp for the season.

“It’s the deterioration of the glacier. The crevasses are starting to open up a lot more than they did at the start of the season. It doesn’t freeze that much overnight. It’s not very conducive to safe travel on glaciers because the snow above the crevasses is really soft, so you don’t have strong enough ice bridges, ”she said.

At present there are not many climbers on the mountain anymore. As teams carry inReach devices, the remaining climbers will be able to text air services directly and may well be the only customers on the Kahiltna Glacier waiting to be picked up when their plane arrives.

Faurot is looking forward to going back next year. Despite the remoteness of her job, she left with a deep respect for the Alaska Range.

“There’s this poem, it’s about appreciating the side of the mountain versus the top,” she said. “It’s not just about going, going, going, reaching the top, it’s the only thing that matters. It’s about looking at the ground, what you’re walking on, what you’re walking over, and enjoying everything it takes to get to the top.

And you can be sure that part of that appreciation is reserved for people like Faurot, who works from his office on the Kahiltna Glacier.


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Christmas events in July promise fun

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For some, Christmas in July may involve grabbing a bowl of popcorn and throwing yourself in front of the Hallmark Channel for the month.

But for those looking for a more active way to celebrate, Central Ohio has plenty of options.

Zoombezi Bay will celebrate the occasion with a week-long vacation extravaganza, which was slowed down last year due to the pandemic, but is now returning to normal.

“Christmas in July” at the park will take place from 10:30 am to 5 pm Monday through Sunday next week.

“We’ll have holiday characters, elves and some of our zoo mascot characters dressed in their best party clothes, and the park will be playing tropical Christmas songs, like the Beach Boys and Jimmy Buffett,” said Jeff Glorioso. , director of experimental marketing. for the Columbus Zoo and Aquarium.

Pine-scented snow will fly, Wendy’s will sponsor a holiday giveaway at 12:25 p.m. each day, and iced hot chocolate and mint ice cream will be on sale.

And at 8:00 p.m. on July 23, vacationers can watch “National Lampoon’s Christmas Vacation” while floating in the wave pool or stretching out on a lounge chair.

Even the elves are having fun in Zoombezi Bay.

Select Wendy’s restaurants will be offering discounted tickets to the “Christmas in July” event at Zoombezi Bay.

For more information, call 614-645-3400 or visit columbuszoo.org.

Is this a leg lamp that we see?

“A Christmas Story” enters the scene

You can also head to the North Pole for a theatrical adaptation of “A Christmas Story,” which will be performed at the Mansfield Playhouse, 95 E. 3rd St., Mansfield at 7pm Friday and Saturday and 2:30 pm. Sunday, with tickets ranging from $ 8 to $ 13.

“We were in rehearsals for ‘A Christmas Story’ at the beginning of December last year,” said Doug Wertz, artistic director and chairman of the board of the Playhouse. “Then we decided the safest thing to do was shut it down. “

During the months that they were closed, they renovated the theater, and then when the restrictions were lifted, they resumed operations.

“We decided that since we had had the set built on stage in recent months, we were going to have Christmas in July. All but one of the original cast members were able to join us. It’s such a fun story, it really works anytime of the year.

For more information, call 419-522-2883 or visit mansfieldplayhouse.com.

Colomb Theater:Musicals, plays and other shows this summer in Columbus

Santa and Mrs Claus will make an appearance in Dublin

Kids and their parents can also get in the holiday mood from noon to 2:00 pm on July 25 with a “Christmas in July” celebration at the Coffman Park Pavilion, 5200 Emerald Parkway, Dublin.

The show, which lasts approximately 75 minutes, features song, dance, story time and classic holiday carols. Afterwards, the children will have the opportunity to take pictures with Santa Claus, Mrs. Claus and other characters.

Things to do in Columbus:Ready to get the family out of the house? Things to do with kids in the Columbus area this summer

“The kids didn’t really have Christmas like they usually do last year, so that helps make up for that,” said Paulette Thomas, former BalletMet dancer and owner of Paulette’s Princess Parties, which hosts the show. .

“People will come in, and we’ll give them all a snowball and have a big snowball fight. Santa will be there in his summer outfit, with the one and only Mrs. Claus – that’s me – in her summer outfit.

The price of the show is $ 35 for a family, which includes parents or other caregivers and children.

For more information, call 614-395-6330, or visit paulettesprincessparties.com.

Gahanna walks, runs for the benefit of the Ho Ho Ho Wagons

Those with energy to spare, or maybe an elf costume to show off, can take part in the 5K Christmas Walk and Fun Run in July, starting at 9 a.m. on July 25 at Academy Park, 1201 Cherry Bottom Road, Gahanna. The cost of $ 35 goes directly to the local charity Wagons Ho Ho Ho, which builds 1,500 toy cars each year in December, fills them with holiday meals and distributes them to local charities.

“This is our 14th year of building wagons and the fourth year of the Fun Run,” said Donn Ditzhazy, co-founder of Wagons Ho Ho Ho. “We still have a lot of Santa Claus there, a lot of elves, people who have fun, whether they are walking or running in competition. “

This year, the race also has a virtual option, open until September, for those who might not be inspired to run in the July weather.

“If you do it virtually, you still get a great goodie bag with a t-shirt and a participation medal,” Ditzhazy notes.

For more information, visit www.wagonshohoho.org.

Share your holiday spirit by singing along at the karaoke bar

If you’d rather sing rather than run, head to Chubby’s Sports Bar and Grill at 7 p.m. July 24, 1846 Hard Road for a Christmas karaoke night in July. In addition to karaoke, there will be a prize for the best costume, an exchange of gifts and drink specials.

For more information, call 614-587-7222 or visit sportsbarcolumbusoh.com.


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