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The outlook: a dull week ahead; where is the foliage? | Time

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We are entering an extended period of gloomy weather for the week ahead, an certainly daunting prospect as a delayed fall foliage season continues to disappoint peepers.

Cool and humid sum up the days ahead well, with frequent downpours expected to continue through Monday, and some thunderous rumbles are possible.

The northern and central Berkshires, as well as eastern New York City, are the target of the heaviest showers, according to the National Weather Service in Albany, NY.

By noon Tuesday, 1 to 2 inches will be added to our already record precipitation from late June to mid-September. With 43 inches in the Pittsfield Municipal Airport tonnage for the year so far, we are running 25 percent above par.

By midweek, expect a tendency to dry out, but stagnant weather systems will prolong cloudiness until next weekend.

After a downright cold Monday and Tuesday, temperatures will once again be above normal, and this is the main reason we still see so much greenery on our hills and in our valleys. This week’s averages, based on data since 1938: highs of 62; minimum of 42.

As for the first light frost: none in sight this week – another late arrival, based on past history.

For later in the week, look for what meteorologists call “choppy weather” – lots of cloud, possible sun breaks, and rain likely to delay until Sunday.

The Climate Prediction Center’s extended outlook heading into the middle of the month (October 10-16) indicates temperatures are holding above normal, along with a period of drought.

Foliage update






fishermen

Three fishermen at the corner along the shore of the Cheshire Reservoir in Cheshire on Sunday morning, before the rain set in in the afternoon.



As a most welcome but late visitor to the feast for the display of fall colors, the county of Berkshire remains on the cusp of peak season. The early leaf change is significantly behind schedule, and early predictions of a brilliant show could turn out to be wrong.

This year, many areas have yet to leave their summer green hues. In northern Maine, where peak conditions typically arrive in late September, rangers recently reported less than 70 percent color change.

But, observers in the High Peaks region of the Adirondacks saw almost all the colors this weekend.

Achieving these peak colors is a delicate balance, compromised by changes in the environment, said Paul Schaberg, research plant physiologist at the US Forest Service in Burlington, Vermont. Warm fall temperatures can cause leaves to stay green for longer and delay the onset of what leaf watchers are looking for.

National overview

Earlier this week, excessive precipitation warnings were issued for the Tennessee and Ohio valleys and parts of the Great Lakes, extending to the central Gulf Coast, southeast and south. of the Appalachians. Southern California and the southwest are expected to see beneficial rains. Precipitation will persist for most of the week in the southeastern and central Atlantic states.

In California, smoke from wildfires is causing poor air quality in the San Joaquin Valley through Tuesday, but later in the week precipitation and a cooling trend are expected for the coastal states. Where is.

Floridians are expected to enjoy mostly sunny skies and high pressure levels in the mid-1980s until Friday, the start of a rainy weekend forecast.

Forest fire report






Savage

Embers light up the hills as the Dixie Fire burns in August near Milford, California. Nine of the 10 biggest fires in California since 1932, when modern records began, have occurred in the past decade. And the eight biggest have burned down since 2017.




Nine of California’s 10 biggest wildfires since 1932, when modern records began, have occurred in the past decade. And surprisingly, the biggest eight have burned down since 2017.

“It’s a combination of everything – climate change, decades of fire suppression and drought,” said Craig Clements, director of the Fire Weather Lab at San Jose State University at the San Jose Mercury. News. So-called mega-fires, consuming over 100,000 acres, were once rare but are becoming more and more common.

A major contributor is the ongoing drought: the past two years have been the driest in Northern California since 1976-77.

The lack of rain and snow left the vegetation dangerously dry. Add to this that climate change is causing warmer temperatures, especially at night, a time when firefighters in the past could take over. Warmer temperatures melt snow and extend the fire season. Meanwhile, more and more people are moving to areas prone to fires, increasing the risk of inflammation.

In the past 10 years, 12.7 million acres have burned in California, 1 in 8 acres in the state. And that’s double the 6.4 million acres from the previous decade.

Climate surprise






Antarctic

Amid a record-breaking summer in much of the northern hemisphere, beset by devastating fires, floods and hurricanes, Antarctica was mired in an unusually deep and deep frost, breaking records even in the coldest place on the planet.




Global warming is a term that no longer applies. What we are seeing is extreme climate change. And there are unexpected impacts.

Amid a record-breaking summer in much of the northern hemisphere, beset by devastating fires, floods and hurricanes, Antarctica was mired in an unusually deep and deep frost, breaking records even in the coldest place on the planet.

The average temperature at Amundsen-Scott station at the South Pole from April to September, freezing cold of minus 78 degrees, was the coldest on record since 1957. It was 4.5 degrees below the 30-year average. more recent, according to confirmed field reports. by researchers at NASA’s Global Modeling and Assimilation Office.

The average temperature in September was also the coldest on record at the South Pole, said David Bromwich, a polar researcher at Ohio State University. Extreme cold over Antarctica has helped push sea ice levels surrounding the continent to their fifth highest level on record in August, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center.

Information from the Washington Post and the Associated Press was included in this report.


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